The Distributed SQL Blog

Thoughts on distributed databases, open source, and cloud native

YugabyteDB Engineering Update – Dec 9, 2019

We are pleased to announce that YugabyteDB 2.0.7 is live!  You can read the official release notes of this and previous versions here. This release is shipping with almost 30 new enhancements and bug fixes.

What’s YugabyteDB? It is an open source, high-performance distributed SQL database built on a scalable and fault-tolerant design inspired by Google Spanner.

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9 Techniques to Build Cloud-Native, Geo-Distributed SQL Apps with Low Latency

This post is an in-depth look at the various techniques that applications needing low latency and high availability can leverage while using a geo-distributed SQL database like YugabyteDB so that the negative impacts of an high-latency, unreliable Wide Area Network (WAN) are minimized.

Geo-Distributed SQL is the Future of RDBMS

Enterprises are increasingly moving to cloud-native applications powered by microservices architecture.

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Best Practices and Recommendations for Distributed SQL on Kubernetes

YugabyteDB and Kubernetes have very complementary design principles because they both rely on an extensible and flexible API layer, as well as a scale-out architecture for performance and availability. In this blog post we’ll look at best practices and recommendations when choosing Kubernetes as the cluster foundation for a distributed SQL system. This will begin with a review of relevant architectural decisions of the YugabyteDB.

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Distributed SQL on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) with YugabyteDB’s Helm Chart

The glory days of the heavy-weight hypervisor are slowly fading away, and in the last few years, containerization of applications and services is the new reality. With containerization, enterprises can prototype, deploy, and meet scale demands more quickly. To systematically and efficiently manage these large-scale deployments, enterprises have bet on technologies like Kubernetes (aka k8s), a powerful container orchestrator, to get the job done.

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Rise of Globally Distributed SQL Databases – Redefining Transactional Stores for Cloud Native Era

At last month’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon in Seattle, the single biggest change from previous container-related conferences was the excitement among the end user companies around their adoption of Kubernetes and the associated cloud native infrastructure ecosystem. The CNCF End User Community page today lists 50+ enterprises and 21+ case studies including those from industry bellwethers such as Capital One,

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Understanding How YugabyteDB Runs on Kubernetes

As we reviewed in “Docker, Kubernetes and the Rise of Cloud Native Databases”, Kubernetes has benefited from rapid adoption to become the de-facto choice for container orchestration. This has happened in a short span of only 4 years since Google open sourced the project in 2014. YugabyteDB’s automated sharding and strongly consistent replication architecture lends itself extremely well to containerized deployments powered by Kubernetes orchestration.

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Docker, Kubernetes and the Rise of Cloud Native Databases

Containerized Stateful Services Are Here

Results from the 2018 Kubernetes Application Usage Survey should put to rest concerns enterprise users have had around the viability of Docker containers and Kubernetes orchestration for running stateful services such as databases and message queues. Its exciting to see that nearly 40% of respondents are running databases (SQL and/or NoSQL) using Kubernetes.

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Orchestrating Stateful Apps with Kubernetes StatefulSets

Kubernetes, the open source container orchestration engine that originated from Google’s Borg project, has seen some of the most explosive growth ever recorded in an open source project. The complete software development lifecycle involving stateless apps can now be executed in a more consistent, efficient and resilient manner than ever before. However, the same is not true for stateful apps — containers are inherently stateless and Kubernetes did not do anything special in the initial days to change that.

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