The Distributed SQL Blog

Thoughts on distributed databases, open source, and cloud native

Why I Joined Yugabyte

Databases are omnipresent

Back in 2016 I started at Nutanix, fresh after finishing my graduate studies. This was barely a couple of weeks after two of Nutanix’s employees, Karthik and Kannan, left to start Yugabyte with Mikhail Bautin. They were still the subject of a few watercooler chats at Nutanix, mainly because of their bold decision to enter the database market,

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Reimagining the RDBMS for the Cloud

Perspectives from 5 years of building a cloud native database

YugabyteDB just turned 5 years old, and I cannot help but reminisce about our journey in building this database over the last half-decade. I vividly remember the genesis of the YugabyteDB project, which started with Kannan, Mikhail, and myself meeting for lunch at a restaurant to discuss the future of cloud native databases.

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The Planned 2021 YugabyteDB Roadmap

Our mission at Yugabyte is to build the default distributed SQL database for cloud native applications in a multi cloud world. We recently announced the general availability of Yugabyte 2.5, which brought new features like Geo-Partitioning and Enterprise-Grade security features in addition to major enhancements in multi-region deployments and performance – while also improving on high availability,

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Announcing Distributed SQL Summit Asia Registration Is Now Open!

Earlier this year, we held the second annual Distributed SQL Summit, a free online conference to push the boundaries of cloud native RDBMS forward. (You can view all the talks on our Vimeo channel) Attendee feedback was very positive, the engagement level was high, and the talks were amazing! We heard the request from several community members to take the show on the (virtual) road to other timezones to make it easier to join live.

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What’s New in YugabyteDB Docs – December 2020

Welcome to this latest post on what’s new and improved in YugabyteDB Docs! We’re continually adding to and updating the documentation to give you the information you need to make the most out of YugabyteDB. 

As a reminder, YugabyteDB provides two distributed SQL APIs:

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YugabyteDB Open Source Community Update – November 2020

We just released YugabyteDB 2.5, and open source software like this doesn’t happen without an awesome open source community backing it. As the year draws to a close, we’d like to take the opportunity to call out some YugabyteDB community highlights from 2020.

Our commitment to open source

First, it is worth restating that YugabyteDB doesn’t pay lip service to open source like other database projects.

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Distributed SQL Summit Schedule Now Live!

In two weeks, thought leaders, database builders, and application developers are coming together for a free online conference to push the boundaries of cloud native RDBMS forward. Distributed SQL (Virtual) Summit, now in its second year, is taking place September 15-17.

We’re excited to announce that the 2020 Distributed SQL Summit schedule is now live!

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Staying Connected During COVID-19: Join Us at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2020

We are excited to sponsor KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2020 and participate alongside other open source and cloud native communities coming together to drive cloud native computing forward. Although many people across the world remain physically distanced (us included), we believe that coming together as a community and maintaining a sense of connection are still very essential and important.

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Introducing yugabyted, the Simplest Way to Get Started with YugabyteDB

Users familiar with YugabyteDB’s architecture know that it is based on two servers where cluster metadata storage and administrative operations are managed by a YB-Master metadata server that is independent from the YB-TServer database server. The end result is that the YB-Master server can be configured and tuned (in a manner that is completely isolated from YB-TServer) to achieve higher performance and faster resilience than a single-server architecture.

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