The Distributed SQL Blog

Thoughts on distributed databases, open source and cloud native

Spanning the Globe without Google Spanner

Open Source Geo-Distributed Relational Database on Multi-Cluster Kubernetes

Google Spanner, conceived in 2007 for internal use in Google AdWords, has been rightly considered a marvel of modern software engineering. This is because it is the world’s first horizontally-scalable relational database that can be stretched not only across multiple nodes in a single data center but also across multiple geo-distributed data centers,

Read More

Bringing Distributed SQL to VMware Tanzu

VMware Tanzu, the newest offering from VMware’s stable of proven enterprise products, brings together a portfolio of open source projects for modernizing applications and automating infrastructure management. VMware Tanzu provides a managed Kubernetes environment on VMware vSphere or any public cloud of choice that allows a consistent way to provision and deploy the code for application developers.

Read More

Scaling Relational Spring Microservices Without Load Balancers

This article was originally posted on JAXenter.com.

Modern cloud native applications demand relational databases to be highly available while being able to scale to millions of requests (RPS) and thousands of transactions per second (TPS) on demand. This is becoming essential to meet the seamless experience demanded by business applications and their users. High availability and scalability in NoSQL databases like Apache Cassandra and MongoDB are well understood,

Read More

Scaling a Hasura GraphQL Backend with Distributed SQL

GraphQL is taking the modern development world by storm having been adopted by companies like Facebook, GitHub and Intuit because it solves many of the common problems developers encounter when working with REST APIs. For example, it solves issues like overfetching (getting more data than your response needs) and underfetching (having to make multiple fetches to get all the data you need),

Read More

Automating YugabyteDB Deployments with Google Cloud Deployment Manager

This is the second post in the Getting Started with YugabyteDB on Public Cloud series. In our first post, we covered Automating YugabyteDB Deployments with AWS CloudFormation templates. In this post we will show you how to achieve the same with Cloud Deployment Manager templates when using Google Cloud.

For redundancy across multiple fault domains inside a single region,

Read More

Basic CRUD Operations Using Hasura GraphQL with Distributed SQL on GKE

GraphQL is an MIT-licensed project originally developed at Facebook in 2012 and open-sourced a few years later. It is rapidly increasing in popularity with more than 29 million downloads to date. Why? Think of GraphQL as a query language for APIs and a runtime for fulfilling those queries with your existing data. GraphQL provides a complete and understandable description of the data in your API,

Read More

Automating YugabyteDB Deployments with AWS CloudFormation

YugabyteDB is easy to get started with on the infrastructure of your choice including public cloud platforms, private cloud environments, and any Kubernetes distribution. For example, you can quickly customize and deploy in AWS thanks to CloudFormation templates. AWS CloudFormation is one of the many ways to automate a public cloud deployment in a consistent manner.

Before we dive in,

Read More

Getting Started with pgbench and Distributed SQL on GKE

pgbench is a simple program for running benchmark tests on PostgreSQL. It runs the same sequence of SQL commands over and over, possibly in multiple concurrent database sessions, and then calculates the average transaction rate (transactions per second). By default, pgbench tests a scenario that is loosely based on TPC-B, involving five SELECT, UPDATE, and INSERT commands per transaction.

Read More

Getting Started with Falco Runtime Security and Cloud Native Distributed SQL on Google Kubernetes Engine

Falco is an incubating CNCF project that provides cloud native, open source runtime security for applications running in Kubernetes environments. Falco monitors process behaviors to detect anomalous activity and help administrators gain deeper insights into process execution.  Behind the scenes, Falco leverages the Linux-native extended Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF) technology to analyze network traffic and audits a system at the most fundamental level,

Read More