The Distributed SQL Blog

Thoughts on distributed databases, open source and cloud native

Technical Deep Dive into YugabyteDB 1.1

We announced the general availability of YugabyteDB 1.1 earlier this week. You can download the latest version for your OS or use our default container image as documented in our Quick Start page.

YugabyteDB is an open source database for high performance applications that require ACID transactions and multi-region data distribution. By combining transactional NoSQL and distributed SQL in a single database,

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Announcing YugaByte DB 1.1 and Company Update

The team at YugaByte is excited to announce that YugaByte DB 1.1 is officially GA! You can download the latest version from our Quick Start page. New in this release:

YugaByte DB Open Source

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How Does the Raft Consensus-Based Replication Protocol Work in YugabyteDB?

Editor’s note: This post was originally published August 8, 2018 and has been updated as of May 28, 2020.

As we saw in ”How Does Consensus-Based Replication Work in Distributed Databases?”, Raft has become the consensus replication algorithm of choice when it comes to building resilient, strongly consistent systems. YugabyteDB uses Raft for both leader election and data replication.

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How Does Consensus-Based Replication Work in Distributed Databases?

Editor’s note: This post was originally published August 2, 2018 and has been updated as of May 26, 2020.

Whether it be a WordPress website’s MySQL backend or Dropbox’s multi-exabyte storage system, data replication is at the heart of making data durable and available in the presence of hardware failures such as machine crashes,

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New to Google Cloud Databases? 5 Areas of Confusion That You Better Be Aware of

After billions of dollars in capital expenditure and reference customers in every major vertical, Google Cloud Platform has finally emerged as a credible competitor to Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure when it comes to enterprise-ready cloud infrastructure. While Google Cloud’s compute and storage offerings are easier to understand, making sense of its various managed database offerings is not for the faint-hearted.

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Implementing Distributed Transactions the Google Way: Percolator vs. Spanner

Our post 6 Signs You Might be Misunderstanding ACID Transactions in Distributed Databases describes the key challenges involved in building high performance distributed transactions. Multiple open source ACID-compliant distributed databases have started building such transactions by taking inspiration from research papers published by Google. In this post, we dive deeper into Percolator and Spanner, the two Google systems behind those papers,

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A Primer on ACID Transactions: The Basics Every Cloud App Developer Must Know

ACID transactions were a big deal when first introduced formally in the 1980s in monolithic SQL databases such as Oracle and IBM DB2. Popular distributed NoSQL databases of the past decade including Amazon DynamoDB and Apache Cassandra initially focused on “big data” use cases that did not require such guarantees and hence avoided implementing them altogether. However, ACID transactions have made a strong comeback in the last several years with the launch of next-generation distributed databases that have built-in support for them.

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How DynamoDB’s Pricing Works, Gets Expensive Quickly and the Best Alternatives

DynamoDB is AWS’s NoSQL alternative to Cassandra, primarily marketed to mid-sized and large enterprises. The uses cases best suited for DynamoDB include those that require a flexible data model, reliable performance, and the automatic scaling of throughput capacity. DynamoDB’s landing page points out that mobile, web, gaming, ad tech, and IoT are all good application types for DynamoDB.

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11 Things You Wish You Knew Before Starting with DynamoDB

DynamoDB is a fully managed NoSQL database offered by Amazon Web Services. While it works great for smaller scale applications, the limitations it poses in the context of larger scale applications are not well understood. This post aims to help developers and operations engineers understand the precise strengths and weaknesses of DynamoDB, especially when it powers a complex large-scale application.

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